Sol 19 Teleconference Videos The video gallery shows videos relating to the Phoenix Mission Teleconference on June 13, 2008.


Animation of "Dodo" and "Goldilocks" Trenches

A pan and zoom animation of the informally named "Dodo" (on left) and "Goldilocks" (on right) trenches as seen by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This animation was based on conditions on the Martian surface on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), the 17th Martian day of the mission. "Baby Bear" is the name of the sample taken from "Goldilocks" and delivered to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Martian Dust Storm on May 18, 2008

This false-color polar map was generated from images obtained by the Mars Reconnaissance
Orbiter's Mars Color Imager (MARCI) on May 18, 2008. It shows a large local dust storm that researchers were monitoring to see if it would affect weather conditions at NASA's Phoenix spacecraft's landing site on landing day, May 25, 2008. The landing site is labeled and marked with the yellow dot.

The dust storm, indicated with yellow arrows in the close-up view, is the sinuous, light-colored feature to the left of the white northern polar cap at the center of the map.

This dust storm was too early and too far away to affect the lander.



Video Credit: Image NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems Download

Schematic Animation of Phoenix's Microscope Station

This animation shows the workings of the microscope station of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

Samples are delivered to the horizontal portion of the sample wheel (yellow) that pokes outside an opening in the box enclosure. The wheel rotates to present the sample to the microscopes. The Optical Microscope (red) can see particles a little smaller than one-tenth the diameter of a human hair. The Atomic Force Microscope (pink) can see particles forty time smaller. The samples are on a variety of substrate surfaces, the small circles on the beveled edge of the sample wheel. For scale, the diameter of the wheel is about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches). Each substrate is a circle 3 millimeters (0.1 inch) in diameter.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona Download

First Dodo Trench with White Layer Visible in Dig Area

This color image was taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager on the ninth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 9 (June 3, 2008). This image of the trench shows a white layer that has been uncovered by the Robotic Arm (RA) scoop and is now visible in the wall of the trench. This trench was the first one dug by the RA to understand the Martian soil and plan the digging strategy.


The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Animated View of Phoenix's Deck Animation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander deck with a view of the MECA (Microscopy Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) instrument in a "clean" view, prior to sample delivery.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

Video Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona. Download

Animated Optical Microscope Zoom in from Phoenix Launch to Martian Surface

This animated camera view zooms in from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander launch site all the way to Phoenix's Microscopy and Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) aboard the spacecraft on the Martian surface. The final frame shows the soil sample delivered to MECA as viewed through the Optical Microscope (OM) on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008), or the 17th Martian day.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona Download

Animation of Sprinkle Sample Delivery to the Optical Microscope This animation shows the Robotic Arm delivering a soil sample to the Optical Microscope instrument aboard the NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander for analysis. Animation based on sample delivery done on Martian Sol 18, the eighteenth day on Mars (June 13, 2008).

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

Video Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona. Download

Phoenix Animation Looking North

This animation is a series of images combined into a panoramic view looking north from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. The area depicted is beyond the immediate workspace of the lander and shows a system of polygons and troughs that connect with the ones Phoenix will be investigating in depth.

The images were taken on sol 14 (June 8, 2008) or the 14th Martian day after landing.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Animation of Panorama of Phoenix Landing Area Looking Southeast

This is an animation of panoramic images taken by NASA?s Phoenix Mars Lander?s Stereo Surface Imager on Sol 15 (June 9, 2008), the 15th Martian day after landing.
The panorama looks to the southest and shows rocks casting shadows, polygons on the surface and as the image looks to the horizon, Phoenix?s backshell gleams in the distance.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Animation of Panorama of Phoenix?s Solar Panel and Robotic Arm

This is an animation of panorama images of NASA?s Phoenix Mars Lander?s solar panel and the lander?s Robotic Arm with a sample in the scoop. The image was taken just before the sample was delivered to the Optical Microscope.

The images making up this animation were taken by the lander?s Surface Stereo Imager looking west during Phoenix?s Sol 16 (June 10, 2008), or the 16th Martian day after landing. This view is a part of the "mission success" panorama that will show the whole landing site in color.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Blowing in the Wind Animations

These are two separate, side-by-side animations made from the same nine images the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took looking into the sky after 5:17 p.m. local time on Sol 8 (June 2, 2008), the eighth Martian day of the mission. The SSI was pointed almost straight up, toward the southwest. Zenith is near the top of the center frame.

In the left animation, the images were stretched to enhance contrast. The right animation highlights variations between each image and the next. The variations are likely dust blown by winds passing through the SSI's field of view. The images suggest the dust is blowing from west to east.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download

Flyover Animation of Phoenix Workspace

This animated ?flyover? of the workspace of NASA?s Phoenix Mars Lander?s was created from images taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 14 (June 8, 2008), or the 14th Martian day after landing.

The visualization uses both of the camera?s ?eyes? to provide depth perception and ranging. The camera is looking north over the workspace.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA?s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University/NASA Ames Download

Digging Movie from Phoenix's Sol 18

The Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander recorded the images combined into this movie of the lander's Robotic Arm enlarging and combining the two trenches informally named "Dodo" (left) and "Goldilocks."

The 21 images in this sequence were taken over a period of about 2 hours during Phoenix's Sol 18 (June 13, 2008), or the 18th Martian day since landing.

The main purpose of the Sol 18 dig was to dig deeper for learning the depth of a hard underlying layer. A bright layer, possibly ice, was increasingly exposed as the digging progressed. Further digging and scraping in the combined Dodo-Goldilocks trench was planned for subsequent sols.

The combined trench is about 20 centimeters (about 8 inches) wide. The depth at the end of the Sol 18 digging is 5 to 6 centimeters (about 2 inches).

The Goldilocks trench was the source of soil samples "Baby Bear" and "Mama Bear," which were collected on earlier sols and delivered to instruments on the lander deck. The Dodo trench was originally dug for practice in collecting and depositing soil samples.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.



Video Credit: Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University Download